Raising the minimum wage: another sign of the times

This video from Blue Collar Logic, explains how the minimum wage should work.  It applies, or should apply, everywhere and anywhere. The current debate about rising minimum wages here in Ontario and around the world is just another sign of the times. Young adults want and expect to earn lots of money at the beginning of their careers, instead of working their way up the ladder as most of their parents and grandparents did.

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A recent post complained about how people here in Ontario are blaming a specific Tim Hortons franchise owner for reacting to a rising minimum wage by cutting back on paid breaks and benefits.  Because this particular franchise owner happened to be the rich relative of the Tim Hortons founder, their actions were judged to be greedy, mean and bully-like.  Because of the greed (perceived) of one small (wealthy) business owner some people are now boycotting all Tim Hortons franchises.  How much sense does that make?

The fact is, one that blind supporters of the rising minimum wages forget or choose to misunderstand, most small businesses are not run by wealthy people.  The majority are run by people who have worked very hard for years to establish their business. Most of them started out working for a low minimum wage, but were ambitious and motivated enough to climb a long ladder to achieve their current success at the top of that ladder.

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Many of these owners have no choice but to cut back when forced with a rise in minimum wage.  It makes no (business) sense to raise the wage of inexperienced new hires simply get their wages closer to that of their owners.  Unless you are a politician looking to get votes after losing face with the hydro fiasco.  Then it makes perfect sense, give the young adults, the ones that don’t yet pay hydro bills, a raise.

 

Tim Hortons is the not the bad guy here folks!

Timmys is not the enemy or bad guy here folks.  I would love to see the statistics as I am willing to bet that most Tim Hortons franchise owners are not billionaires or even millionaires.  In fact, I doubt many other small business owners are either, franchise or not!

 

Tim Hortons

The fact is any business, small or large, has a budget for employee wages, Tim Hortons included.  Even professional sports teams do, there is a lot more money in the salary budget, but there is a budget.  It’s called a salary cap, just ask former Ottawa Senator Kyle Turris.

It is simple math, but much easier to visualize at the small business level.  If you have the budget to pay four employees fifteen bucks an hour and the rate gets raised to twenty bucks an hour, your budget now only allows three employees to get paid. (4×15=3×20=60) It’s not rocket science, just simple math, and it’s going to happen in all small businesses in Ontario after the hike in the minimum wage.  Sooner or later, probably sooner.

This latest vote grab by the Ontario Liberal government is just another reason small business owners are struggling to survive.  Aiming to Wynne (pun intended) the vote from the minimum age earners in the province, our premier has screwed the small business owners.  Not to mention the employees who have worked several years to get to the level that new employees will now get upon starting.  Do you think they will get a raise to compensate?  Right, not a chance!

So go enjoy a coffee at Tim Hortons, they are not the bad guys here!  Maybe while you are drinking your coffee the math will become easier and the picture clearer.

2016 Canadian Brier

 

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The 2016 Brier, sponsored by Tim Hortons, is underway at TD Place in Lansdowne Park, here in Ottawa.  For those of you not familiar with the sport, the Brier is the men’s Canadian curling championship, where all provinces and territories are represented.  Last year’s winning team also qualifies to play as Team Canada.  Opening ceremonies were yesterday afternoon, March 5th.  My seat in an upper row allowed for a great shot of all the teams lined up on the ice during the singing of our national anthem…

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Unfortunately, from this seat, I wasn’t able to get any good closeup shots of the curling matchups within the first draw of the event at 230pm.  I did get a decent shot of Ontario’s team skipped by Glen Howard chatting with the crowd after their victory over Kevin Koe’s team from Alberta…

 

Our tickets for the evening draw (draw 2) at 730 last night were closer to the ice, allowing for some better shots of the three concurrent games.

In these pictures, the two teams on sheet A (top of the picture) are Northern Ontario skipped by Brad Jacobs and Saskatchewan skipped by Steve Laycock.  Center ice had BC skipped by Jim Cotter playing PEI skipped by Adam Casey.  The third sheet (bottom of pictures) pitted North West Territories skipped by Jamie Koe against New Brunswick skipped by Mike Kennedy…

 

The former cattle castle, currently known as the Aberdeen Pavillion, houses the “Brier Patch” the entertainment center of the Brier.   Fans, players and volunteers congregate and mingle here between and after draws.  We dropped by Friday evening, just in time to see and hear all of the teams being introduced to their appreciative fans.  After their introductions, the team members wandered through the crowd, stopping for autographs and posing for photos.

Opening day at the 2016 Brier was a great time.  The recently renovated TD Place and Landsdowne Park area in Ottawa is a beautiful venue for an event like this.  Plenty of parking, free bus service to and from the games, and a wide variety of shops and restaurants all within walking distance make it enjoyable for everyone.   We even got to chat with Jim Cotter, skip of the BC team, while out for lunch at Whole Foods Market.   The weather was perfect too for strolling around the area.

The caliber of the curling competition is outstanding this year at the Brier, with no team favoured to win easily.  We plan to go back later in the week as the competition heats up, with playoffs on the weekend leading into the final game on Sunday, March 13.