Social media busts vandal in Kingston

If you read one of my previous posts you will know how angry and disgusted I was with the idiot that trashed our car at Queen’s University Home Coming celebrations in Kingston, Ontario recently.  Well, thanks to social media his actions were captured and displayed for all to see, including the Kingston Police Department.  Their investigation is pending.

This video shows him on the roof and stepping off onto the front hood.  Listen for the “holy F***, he dented the hood!” at the end.

 

These are the pictures my son’s friends were able to provide us with when we asked for help finding this guy. Thanks to social media!

 

Damages have been estimated at $7200.  Our insurance has said the damages will cost more to repair than what the car is worth.  In other words, it is a write off.  If we pay the $500 deductible, we will end up with a pittance in compensation and no car.  Here are a few pictures of the damage.

We can only assume he broke the brake light on the back spoiler while climbing onto the hood. We also don’t have (visible) proof for the dent in the door, the gouged out rust spot, or the Toyota emblem missing off the front of the car.  We can only hope now that the police prosecute this idiotic (drunk) vandal to the fullest extent possible. I realize we will probably not recover more than the current value of the car, but it sure would be nice to see the police (or other authorities) make an example of this idiot. Too bad Judge Judy doesn’t practice in Canada, she would be all over this guy!

social media

I believe (and judging by the response I have received) it’s the principle of the matter that should rule here.  We are not asking for a new car.  I do think though that this guy should pay to fix the car to the condition it was in before he trashed it, regardless of what it’s blue book value is.  Am I wrong? You be the judge!

Advertisements

Vandalism rampant at Queen’s Home Coming

Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario celebrated home coming this past weekend.  The problem is the celebrations get out of hand each year when idiots resort to vandalizing anything they get their hands on.  This year our car was one of the unfortunate targets of the rampant vandalism.

Our son had taken the car to Kingston for the weekend to spend time with some of his high school buddies that currently attend Queen’s.  We had instructed him to park the car in his friend’s driveway when he got there and leave it parked for the weekend (ie no drinking and driving).  He did what we told him to, sort of.  There was no parking spot available in the driveway when he arrived on Friday, so he parked on the street. When he went to check on the car Saturday, he was dismayed to see that it had been trashed.  The roof was caved in, front and back hoods dented, brake light on the spoiler kicked in, almost every inch of the car covered in scratches and beer stains, as well as the Toyota emblem torn off  the front.

vandalismvandalism

It saddens and sickens me that these so called intelligent students resort to this disgustingly destructive behaviour.  How and why do they feel this behaviour is acceptable?  How do they get away with it?  To all the people standing around watching (apparently there were lots of pictures and a video posted on social media) it happen, WTF were you thinking?

I realize the car in question is old (2003) with lots of mileage.  We planned to keep the car for our youngest son to drive (he’s 21 now) while he still lives at home. The costs to repair the vandalism will most likely be higher than what the car is worth.  Then the insurance deductible will eat up the measly amount we will receive as compensation, but that’s not the point.  The car is our possession, it is incomprehensible how some idiotic kids can damage other peoples’ property with no remorse.

I can promise you any pictures I find of our damaged car on social media will be forwarded to the police to supplement the original report.  Hopefully, authorities will find the culprits that thought this was funny and penalize these idiots accordingly. I am hoping the power of social media will bite them in the butt.

If you recognize any of these students, please let me know!

Sticks and stones

Sticks and stones will break your bones,  but names will never hurt you.  That’s what I was always taught as a youngster, but times have changed.  It is now obvious that those names do and have done more damage than we gave them credit for.  It is now referred to as bullying.  Names do hurt, the damage is just buried deep and not as visible.

I don’t think of myself as over sensitive, but I do admit I can remember every mean thing ever said to me.  For example, I remember a boy taunting me at the age of 12 because I was wearing a training bra.  I was an obvious late bloomer and very self-conscious about it. Did the insensitive comment ruin my life?  No, but it did hurt enough for me to remember it 45 years later.  I have never been at the (intentional) receiving end of the proverbial sticks and stones, so cannot compare the two hurts.

Bullying is rampant in today’s society.  Suicide rates are skyrocketing with bullying the leading cause.  With the availability and popularity of so many forms of social media, bullies can strike anywhere, anytime, without ever having to meet their victim in person, face to face.

When social media first came to be my eldest son was ten years old.  That was in 1999, the year AOL, Yahoo and MSN all released their own messenger services.  All of a sudden it became very easy to (bully) say hurtful things to classmates, (former) friends, acquaintances, even strangers.  His teacher was so concerned about the hurtful comments that were going around she organized a parent meeting to warn parents and curb the bullying behaviour.   I remember telling my son then “you should never message someone things that you do not have the nerve to say to their face”

That was before every child over the age of six had their own cell phone, in fact many parents did not yet have one.  Most of the messages sent, both good and bad, were done on a home computer.  Parents had some control over what and when their children were communicating and who they were communicating with.

Today our teens and preteens (and many adults) are glued to their cell phones, with access to everyone and everything, anywhere.  The advances in technology make it easier to do just about anything on a cell phone.

Everything except communicate face to face.

An inspirational message shared by a childhood friend on Facebook inspired this post:

27866996_299140940609625_741242083464953226_n

Please be sure to visit my other blogs:
Laugh out loud (LOL) with me at Your Daily Chuckle
and
Be inspired and motivated by famous words of wisdom at WoW
My gardening website can be viewed at gardens4u.ca

 

Bell Lets Talk Day

 

Today, January 31, is Bell Lets Talk Day.  Bell Canada will donate 5 cents to Canadian mental health for each mobile and long distance call or text, Bell Let’s Talk Day video view on social media, use of the Bell Let’s Talk Facebook frame or Snapchat filter and #BellLetsTalk tweet or retweet.  Texts and phone calls must be from Bell, Bell Alliant, or Bell MTS customers.  If you have an IPhone, be sure to turn off your imessage before you text to ensure your texts are included in the count.

Bell Lets Talk Day

 

Do what you can to help this awesome cause.  Let’s see if we can beat the incredible 2017 results!

 

 

Apologies to a Stranger…

Recently my 15 year old son and I encountered a young couple on a street corner that appeared to be out for an early evening (still daylight) run.   She was sitting awkwardly on the sidewalk holding her ankle/lower leg, obviously in pain.  He was standing over her trying to help.  As we approached the couple, I rolled down my window to ask if they needed help in the form of a cellphone or ride etc.    At the same time, before the young man could respond, my son started yelling at me:  “What are you doing?  Why should we stop?  You’re so weird, talking to complete strangers!”

I am embarrassed to say my son’s outburst provoked an angry, hurt and disappointed reaction in me.  Instead of stopping to see if we could help the couple, we drove off towards home.  When I had cooled down I told my son that his reaction was not only hurtful and mean to me, but showed a complete lack of compassion towards others.  What if one of his family members or friends was hurt in a public setting and no one stopped to help?

This may sound harsh or naive on my part, but I have seen similar behaviour in some of the comments I see coming from him on facebook and twitter, even in his regular conversations with friends and family members.  I can’t help but feel his words are a form of bullying, potentially harmful to sensitive teens at the receiving end.

My son did apologize to me and agreed that stopping to help would have been the “right thing to do”  He also agreed that he would make an effort to stop the offensive comments on social media.