Garden centers are open!

Hurray, the gardens centers in Ottawa are open for business, a sure sign of spring!  These pictures were taken two weeks ago now when I spotted my first open garden center and could not resist stopping in…

 

Perennials can be planted any time now, as soon as the ground is thawed.  Annuals should wait until after the last frost date for your time zone.

Happy gardening!

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Mirror mirror on the wall…

Instead of “mirror, mirror on the wall”, I should say “gardens, gardens on my route,  who’s the fairest of them all?”  I know that “all” does not rhyme with “route”, but let me ensure you get the picture, literally…. Continue reading

Awesome autumn

The best part of autumn is the awesome display of color in the trees and gardens.  Our weather here in Ottawa has been spectacular, in fact so spectacular that I have put off preparing garden beds for the winter.  All of my clients’ gardens are looking great with their late season displays…

…annuals are still going strong, in containers:

annual-containerscoleus-containers-3coleus-containerspig 1

 

and in the gardens:

 

late blooming perennials are still glorious:

 

and ornamental grasses are at their showiest:

 

I hope we have a few more weeks of this awesome weather to enjoy the gardens before the cold weather hits.

July garden pictures

Welcome to my gardens:

 

As you go through the gate, my “ICU” is on the right side along the fence and beside the steps.  Any unwanted plants I rescue from clients’ gardens get potted up and live here until I can recycle them into other gardens.  My son built the shelving unit on the right to use as a potting bench as well as a spot to store my pots, soil, tools etc.

 

 

 

As my children grew, so did my gardens; there is very little lawn left these days.  Beyond the white arbor is my compost corner.  The fences are covered with vines and the beds chock full of perennials.  Two apple trees and a lilac on one side and two plum trees on the other add shady spots with dappled sun, while the center offers full sun conditions. This variation in growing conditions allows for a wide range of perennials…

 

The pond was put in years ago as a Mother’s Day gift.  The racoons came from my father’s garden and the frog is a new visitor.  Unfortunately, the real racoons that visit frequently like to knock over these guys; I often find one or all of them in the pond!…

 

The front yard has lots of sun, so it is great for roses, lilies and succulents.  The focus of the front garden is the “dwarf” blue spruce that was supposed to reach 5 feet.  It is currently at least 12 feet tall…

 

 

Various pots and containers offer added color throughout the gardens…

 

What I love most about the gardens is how they change from week to week from spring to fall.

 

 

Spring is here, I hope

While my turkey was cooking this afternoon, I took the opportunity to get outside in the beautiful sunshine we are enjoying this weekend.  Most of my yard is bare with just a few patches of snow left.  I saw a few buds and stems of perennials basking in the sunshine too…

 

     My pond is still frozen with the plants around it covered in snow…

pond

 

A quick peek at my gardens turned into a chance to trim back some ornamental grasses that I left over the winter…

These ornamental grasses are best trimmed right now when they start to show some new growth.  Another garden chore that can be done very early is the trimming of any dead, crossing or undesirable branches on your trees.  It is much easier to do now than when the leaves emerge as you can see the shape of the tree better.

The rest of the plants are best left alone for a while yet…

 

 

The advantages of deadheading perennials

Deadheading perennials in your garden involves removing spent flower heads.  You can either pinch the flower heads off between your finger and thumb, or cut them off with clippers.  Sometimes, especially when flower heads are small, (coreopsis for example) you can shear off the flower heads with shearers.  If roses flower in clusters, snip off the whole stem of the cluster.  If they flower singly, snip off just the flower head.

Whichever way you do it, deadheading has its advantages.  It makes your garden look tidier, prevents plants from reseeding themselves and sometimes promotes reblooming.  I have had several reblooms on my coreopsis, roses, salvias, coneflowers and widows tears this season.

Learn how to deadhead your perennials to extend their flowering season.

The when and how of pruning perennials

 

Are you confused as to when and how to prune your perennials in your garden?  Follow these simple instructions and guidelines to make the task easier.

FALL 

fall cleanup should include removal of any dead or diseased foliage. Any cleanup you get done in fall makes for less work in the spring and prevents the spread of disease.  Water plants well, especially evergreens, before the ground freezes to ensure they are well hydrated over the winter.  Fall is a good time to add compost around your plants to improve the quality of your soil, especially clay soil.  Mulch can also be added in the fall, preferably after the ground freezes.

anemones:  cut back after frost

daisies: cut back to 6 inches in fall.  

geraniums (perennial):  cut back if frost turns leaves mushy, otherwise leave foliage on over winter.

grasses (ornamental):  can be cut back to ground in fall or left intact over winter.  If left, cut back first thing in spring, before new growth appears.

hemerocallis/daylilies: remove dead leaves or cut back whole plant to 4 inches.  Although these do not have to be cut back in the fall, it will prevent messy/slimy cleanup in spring.

iris (bearded): cut plants back to 6 inches after frost to prevent disease.  Overgrown clumps should be separated in late summer or early fall.

ligularia: remove leaves when frost turns them mushy

monarda/beebalm:  cut plants back to 6 inches to prevent mildew

peony:  cut plants back to 8 inches to prevent mildew

phlox (tall): cut plants back to prevent mildew

poppy:  leave foliage over winter for protection.  Move or divide in August only

queen of prairie/filipendula: cut back in fall after blooming

salvia:  cut back to 8 inches in fall

sunflowers/helianthus:  cut back to 8 inches in fall

AFTER BLOOMING

some plants just need deadheading (removing dead flower heads), others need the long flower stalks removed. Others require shearing back the plant by half of its size. Each of these techniques improves the appearance of the plants and sometimes promotes reblooming…

achillea:  cut flower stalks back to base after blooming

artemsia:  although they do not flower, cut back plant mid May and late July to prevent flopping

asters:  cut back to 12 inches after blooming in fall

astrantia major/widows’ tears: shear back after flowering to promote reblooming.  Leave foliage on for winter protection

campanula/bellflower: cut flower stalks back to base of plant after blooming

coreopsis/tickseed:  shear off flower stems after blooming

daisies:  remove dead flower heads after blooming to promote rebloom

delphiniums: cut flower stalks back to base after blooming

dianthus/sweet william: shear plant back after blooming

digitalis/foxglove: cut back flower stalks to base of plant after blooming

euphorbia:  cut plant back after blooming to prevent flopping

gaillardia/blanket flower: cut flower stalks back to base of plant after blooming

geraniums (perennial): remove flower stalks after blooming to base of plant to promote rebloom

globe thistle/echinops: cut back late July to promote rebloom

hemerocallis/daylilies: remove flower stalks after blooming

hostas: remove flower stalks after blooming

iris (bearded): cut back flower stalks after blooming

lavender:  cut back flower stalks after blooming to promote rebloom

monarda/beebalm:  cut flower stalks after blooming to promote rebloom

peony:  cut off flower stalks after blooming.

phlox (border): shear back after blooming.  Do not cut back in fall.

poppy: plants go dormant after blooming.  Leave foliage over winter for protection

rudebekia/black eyed susans: deadhead after blooming if desired, do not cut back

salvia: shear back after blooming to promote rebloom

sedums:  cut back both fall blooming and ground cover sedums after flowering.  Flower heads can be left on the fall blooming variety if desired for winter interest.

 SPRING

wait until soil is no longer soggy to avoid compacting it or damaging bulbs, but don’t wait too long.  April is usually best in our zone 4-5 area of Ontario.  If plants looks green and healthy, leave them alone. A light cleanup involves removing dead/brown leaves and stems only.

astilbe: foliage protects plant over winter,  needs light cleanup in spring only

bergenia: needs light cleanup in spring only

campanula/bellflower:  cut plant back in spring.  Cut flower stalks after blooming to base of plant

clematis (most): deadhead spent flowers, cut plant back to 6 inches in spring

coreopsis/tickseed:  cut plant back to 6 inches in spring. Shear off flower stems after blooming

crysthanthemums/mums: foliage protects plant over winter; cut plant back in spring.  Remove faded flower heads after blooming

delphiniums: cut plant back in spring. Cut back flower stalks to base of plant after blooming

diantus/sweet william: foliage protects plant over winter, cut back plant in spring

digitalis/foxglove: requires light cleanup in spring only. Cut flower stalks to base of plant after blooming

echinacea and other coneflowers: deadhead after blooming if desired, only requireslight cleanup in spring

globe thistle/echinops: requires light cleanup in spring only, do not cut back in fall

grasses (ornamental):  if not cut back in fall, cut back to ground BEFORE new growth appears in spring

heuchera/coralbells: leave foliage over winter, requires light cleanup only in spring 

hosta: leave foliage over winter, cut back flower stalks after blooming

hydrangeas:  peegee, annabelle and snowball varieties can be cut back to 12 inches if overgrown

iris (bearded): remove dead leaves to prevent disease.  Can be divided in spring if did not bloom previous spring.

iris (siberian): foliage protects plant over winter, cut back in spring to 4 inches

joe pye weed: no maintenance required

lady’s mantle: light cleanup in spring only

lambs ears: light cleanup in spring only

lavender:  do not cut back in fall, wait until new growth appears in spring to remove winter kill.  Shear flower stalks back after blooming to promote rebloom

liatrus/gayfeather: light cleanup in spring only

lupines: foliage protects plant over winter, light cleanup in spring 

red hot poker: foliage protects plant over winter, light cleanup in spring

russian sage: cut back to 6 inches in spring, only after new growth appears

sedum (fall blooming): cut back to 6 inches in early spring if not done so in fall

AFTER BLOOMING 

some plants just need deadheading (removing dead flower heads), and some need the entire flower stalks removed. Others require shearing back the plant by half of its size. Each of these techniques improves the appearance of the plants

achillea:  cut flower stalks back to base after blooming

artemsia:  although they do not flower, cut back plant mid May and late July to prevent flopping

astrantia major/widows’ tears: shear back after flowering to promote reblooming.  Leave foliage on for winter protection

campanula/bellflower: cut flower stalks back to base of plant after blooming

coreopsis/tickseed:  shear off flower stems after blooming

daisies:  remove dead flower heads after blooming to promote rebloom

delphiniums: cut flower stalks back to base after blooming

dianthus/sweet william: shear plant back after blooming

digitalis/foxglove: cut back flower stalks to base of plant after blooming

euphorbia:  cut plant back after blooming to prevent flopping

gaillardia/blanket flower: cut flower stalks back to base of plant after blooming

geraniums (perennial): remove flower stalks after blooming to base of plant to promote rebloom

globe thistle/echinops: cut back late July to promote rebloom

hemerocallis/daylilies: remove flower stalks after blooming

hostas: remove flower stalks after blooming

iris (bearded): cut back flower stalks after blooming

lavender:  cut back flower stalks after blooming to promote rebloom

monarda/beebalm:  cut flower stalks after blooming to promote rebloom

peony:  cut off flower stalks after blooming.  

phlox (border): shear back after blooming.  Do not cut back in fall.

poppy: plants go dormant after blooming.  Leave foliage over winter for protection

rudebekia/black eyed susans: deadhead after blooming if desired, do not cut back 

salvia: shear back after blooming to promote rebloom

Good luck with your pruning.  There are so many varieties of perennials that I have only named the ones popular in my garden zone.  Do not hesitate to ask if I have missed something you have in your garden.