Include vines in your gardens for colourful vertical drama

Vines make wonderful additions to gardens, providing colourful vertical drama to otherwise horizontal landscapes.  They can be used to cover unsightly fences, utility boxes or pipes, storage areas and more.  They make great privacy screens too, shielding your yard from neighbours’ views.  There are many things to consider when choosing a vine for any of these functions…

  • size matters: consider the coverage you need.  Some vines cover a small space, others need lots of room to sprawl
  • invasive:  some vines can be invasive and very hard to remove from places you don’t want them to grow
  • damage:  some vines can cause incredible damage, destroying eavestroughing, fences and even brick!
  • color: some vines change colour in the fall, an added bonus to landscapes.  Others are a bright, chartreuse green contrasting with other green plants in your yard.  Some have flowers, others are grown just for the foliage.
  • pruning/cutting back: some vines require more maintenance than others.  Many die back to the ground when frost hits them making cleanup easy.  Some have to severely cut back in the spring to prevent them from taking over your yard.
  • annual or perennial:  the vines I use are perennial meaning they come back each year on their own.  Included in the perennial category are clematis, ivy, golden hops, hydrangea, bittersweet, honeysuckle and silver lace. There are also many annual varieties available such as morning glories, sweet peas, black-eyed susans and more.
  • Here are a few I have in my gardens…

Choose a few vines to add vertical drama to your landscaping, just do your homework first so you will be pleased with the result.  As always, if you have any questions, please contact me, I would be happy to research the perfect vine for your garden.

Have you ever seen such a large hydrangea flower head?

Have you ever seen such a large hydrangea flower head?  I have seen lots of hydrangea blossoms, especially since starting my own gardening business (Gardens4u), but never have I seen one so large.  My hand is included in the first picture to lend a sense of scale; the bloom measured 14 x 9 inches…

This plant is a peegee hydrangea which is the only variety of hydrangea that can be grown in tree form.  The cone-shaped blooms are called panicles; the name peegee means panicle shaped hydrangea. The blooms are white tinged with pale pink; gorgeous!

Plants of the week from Gardens4u, take four

Here are my picks for this week…

Traditional perennials: daylilies

daylily blooms are long lasting with a wide variety of colours available ranging from lemon to golden yellow, peach to pink and purple to red.  They are also available in a variety of height to suit all your needs.

Modern perennials: Ornamental grasses

Ornamental grasses are my “go to perennial” for hot dry areas in gardens.  With many heights, colors and seed heads to choose from, you can plant several varieties.  Just be sure to choose those that are suitable fir your garden’s hardiness zone or they will not survive the winter.

Shrubs:  Purple smoke tree

Vines:  climbing hydrangea

Hydrangea vines are slow growing, but once established look beautiful on a wall or fence.  Just do not let it get into your soffits or eavestroughing as it can cause damage.

Annuals: Cleome or spiderflower

I love Cleomes (AKA spiderflowers)  They come in white and several shades of pink.  They look great planted in a container or in the garden in a hot dry spot.

Stay tuned for next week’s picks…

Hydrangea leaf caterpillars

Hydrangea leaves that look like this contain a grub, a stage of the leaf curl moth.  The moths lay their eggs on the leaf then spin a fine silk like web around the eggs to attach them to the leaf.  The silk threads cause the leaf to curl protecting the eggs from predators like birds.  The eggs hatch into caterpillars that eat the leaf and soon become adult moths, continuing the cycle.

Moths prefer leaves of lilac trees due to their softer texture, but if a hydrangea is next to a lilac, the moths will lay their eggs on hydrangea leaves too.  As soon as you see the leaves curled on either lilac or hydrangea bushes or trees, remove the leaves and burn, crush or shred them to kill the eggs.

I saw some of these on hydrangea leaves last summer.  I tried to kill the worms and eggs by spraying with tea tree oil, but it did not seem to work.  I then cut off the infected leaves, which seemed to help.