Writers Write For Many Reasons

When I tell people I am a freelance writer, I often get “Why did you become a writer?”  Good question.  I have always been a bit anal about grammar and spelling, especially in published articles, stories, blog posts etc.  I don’t mind a more relaxed approach to sentence structure, in fact I quite like when writers write like they talk.  

I guess I like sharing my gift of gab and really love seeing my own thoughts in words.  Is that vanity?  Maybe, but if my love of words makes readers laugh, cry, learn and/or think, then I am happy to risk it.  I regard my writing as a sharing of information, expertise and even unsolicited opinions.

Another thing I enjoy about writing is the amount of knowledge I gain when researching an article or post.  You are never to old (or to young) to learn.  We can all learn from our mistakes.  Those that are written down are especially easy to learn from.   Looking back at some of my earliest articles and blog posts I like to think my writing style and technique has evolved. I certainly have learned a lot, especially about SEO and other technical lingo.

Writing also helps me solve problems.  Just as talking things through helps and inspires co-workers, writing words out makes me see things more clearly.  In fact, I used to write tons of study notes when studying for exams years ago.

Hand in hand with writing is reading.  I am often inspired by other people’s work.  That’s because I respect and value others’ opinions and expertise.  I also recognize the importance of supporting writing excellence.  Any excellence and talent actually, whether in the form of art, beauty, fashion or business etc.  Social media has taken criticism and negativity to a whole new level.  People need to realize that it takes nothing away from their own abilities to recognize the talent of others.  

I think the world needs more of this recognition and support, regardless of who created what.  Not respecting others’ opinions and thinking your own view or opinion has to be right and the best is just wrong.  That’s called narcissism, and it can be extremely destructive and divisive.  I won’t name and names here, but you all know which public figure I am referring to.

Writers and readers appear to have a special bond.  My readers and those I follow have become my writing family even though I have never met (most of) them.

 

 

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Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour’s garden is NOT a commandment…

Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour’s garden is not one of the ten commandments.  In fact your neighbour would probably be tickled pink if you admired their garden and asked them for advice.  Better yet, use other people’s gardens as your inspiration for your own dream garden…

Fall is the perfect time to plan and start or restore a garden.  If you do not yet have a garden or would like to modify the one you have, follow this back-ache free method.  I have not yet tried this method, but it appears reasonably easy and scientifically sound.  I would be willing to help anyone wishing to give it a try…

First, decide the shape you want: do you like straight edges or do you prefer rounded, curved edges?  An easy way to visualize the shape is to lay a garden hose on the grass where you want your garden to be, adjusting the hose around the perimeter until you arrive with a shape you like.  A general rule of thumb is to have the garden’s width a minimum of one third its length.  In other words, a foot wide garden around the perimeter of your yard will not be as visually appealing as a wider one.  Remember though, it is your garden, use your artistic genius and go with the shape YOU like!

When the shape has been determined, cut the grass short within the designated area.  You are going to be smothering this grass, so short is best.  Next, lay non-glossy newspaper over the area, wetting each layer, until you have a 3 cm thick soggy mess!  Sprinkle the newspaper layer with a dusting of blood meal for nitrogen.  Then add a 4 cm layer of garden soil that has compost added. (not potting soil or top soil)  Your final layer should be 6 cm of organic, hardwood mulch to hold the other layers in place and to keep weeds from germinating.  It must be organic to decompose and enrich the soil.   Continue to water well between layers and after the mulch for the next few months; do not let your creation dry out!

In the spring, when the soil has warmed up, your garden will be ready to plant.  You do not have to disturb your layers, simply dig out a “plug” of mulch a bit bigger than the size of your plant, add the plant, and replace the mulch.  Remember, to prevent your plants from rotting,  keep the mulch away from the crown of perennials as well as the stems or trunks of shrubs and trees…

Remember, thou shalt not covet thy neighbour’s garden is not a commandment, so feel free to do so!