Why do eggs bother my stomach sometimes but not all the time?

eggs

In addition to wheat, asparagus and cream (high fat), eggs bother my stomach, suggesting I am intolerant of them.  But only sometimes.  I have tried to figure out if it is the way they are cooked (over easy, omelets, scrambled etc), or what they are cooked in (butter, olive oil etc) but have not come up with a definitive answer.  Because I am intolerant of wheat, I have even wondered if I am reacting to eggs from grain fed chickens.

I have done some research to see if I could find the answer; here are a few suggestions I came across:

  • don’t eat eggs on an empty stomach
  • eat other things with the eggs like toast, home fries etc
  • cook them well (over easy used to be my favourite)
  • drink something carbonated with them
  • don’t cook them in butter

I have not tried the carbonated trick yet, but carbonation is not my friend either so I probably won’t.  My last attempt at consuming eggs was in an omelette, with just a bit of olive oil to coat the pan, but a few hours later the omelette went right through me with accompanying stomach cramps and diarrhea.

I ate it by itself though, with no toast on the side, and on an empty stomach, so I may have my answer.

Anyone else have this problem?

food-breakfast-egg-milk

 

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Hydrangea leaf caterpillars

Hydrangea leaves that look like this contain a grub, a stage of the leaf curl moth.  The moths lay their eggs on the leaf then spin a fine silk like web around the eggs to attach them to the leaf.  The silk threads cause the leaf to curl protecting the eggs from predators like birds.  The eggs hatch into caterpillars that eat the leaf and soon become adult moths, continuing the cycle.

Moths prefer leaves of lilac trees due to their softer texture, but if a hydrangea is next to a lilac, the moths will lay their eggs on hydrangea leaves too.  As soon as you see the leaves curled on either lilac or hydrangea bushes or trees, remove the leaves and burn, crush or shred them to kill the eggs.

I saw some of these on hydrangea leaves last summer.  I tried to kill the worms and eggs by spraying with tea tree oil, but it did not seem to work.  I then cut off the infected leaves, which seemed to help.