Flowering shrubs scream “Spring is Here”

It’s a good thing the flowering shrubs know it’s spring. Mother Nature on the other hand, has forgotten that the weather is supposed to warm up. The sunny yellow blooms of my neighbour’s forsythia are a beautiful sight from my bedroom window…

and my own magnolia is also screaming “spring is here!” with its fragrant blooms…

with the blossoms of plum trees not far behind…

My roses (at least the ones in my front yard that are protected from the north winds) are also showing signs of spring…

flowering shrubs
climbing rose
flowering shrubs
shrub rose

Now, if the cold and wet weather would clear up, spring would be awesome!

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Propagation attempts of succulents

If you follow my blog and gardening website, you will know I love succulents of all shapes and sizes. So much so that I included one tiny succulent in each of the party favours I presented to each guest at my daughter-in-law’s baby shower last winter. Tell me you noticed the succulents as the header of this blog’s landing page.

Succulents are my favourite perennials as they tolerate hot sun and require little to no maintenance. Hen and chicks (sempervivum) are especially easy to propagate, simply by removing the ‘chicks’ from their ‘mother’ and inserting them into soil in a new location right in the garden.

This off-season of my gardening business, I decided to try my hand at propagating some succulents inside the house. So far, so good. All I did to encourage propagation was tuck a few leaves from various types of succulents into houseplants around the house. Especially the ones in a sunny location. I also tried placing a few leaves in a small, shallow, clear container into which I added a tiny bit of water. (second picture) The container sits on a north facing window sill.

The leaves withered up, but tiny new plants emerged at the base of the leaf in each propagation attempt. Just be sure to keep the soil moist around the leaves inserted in soil as well as a tiny bit (just enough to keep emerging roots wet) of water in the bottom of the container.

Essential Oils for Fragrance as Nature Intended

If you are not aware of what essential oils can do for you, it’s time to learn. Current research is revealing the presence of many harmful toxins in perfumes, air fresheners, cleaning and laundry products. I am not surprised as have had reactions to anything scented for years now.

Essentially (pun intended) essential oils are concentrated aromatic compounds made from plants. Each plant has its own unique scent or flavor known scientifically as its essence. They are to be inhaled or diluted to rub on the skin, but never ingested. Research claims they have the power to control our emotions and moods and even our health.

As you can probably imagine, essential oils come in many scents. Just think of all the unique scents in nature. You can buy them individually or in sets of many different aromas. Essential oils can be purchased in bottles or rollers for easy application to your skin. My personal favourite scent is called Citrus Kiss for a subtle sweet lemon scent. I also love the Skin Envy combination of five essential oils on my face. I get both online from Vitality Extracts. Check out their website for all the different options, there are tons!

Essential oils can we used as perfume to be worn in jewellery that diffuses the scent of the oil as you wear it. Bracelets, necklaces and rings are very popular, and quite elegant worn as casual jewellery. They contain either lava stones, semi precious stones or glass beads that you rub the oil onto.

These versatile essential oils can also be used to scent your laundry by adding a few drops to dryer balls or a damp facecloth in your load as it goes into the dryer. Another way to use them around the house is to put drops on a cotton ball or tissue to deodorize garbage cans and other smelly spots. Or add some to a misting or spray bottle with water to spray on carpets, rugs, furniture, etc. A few drops of lavender oil on our under your pillow is reportedly a great way to ensure a relaxing sleep.

get a good nights sleep!

If you don’t wear jewellery, an even more convenient way to use essential oils is with a room diffuser. Like a vaporizer, you add drops of oil to water in the diffuser, plug it in and turn it on so the aroma spreads through your room. With many colors, shapes and sizes available, you can be sure to find one to suit your décor in any room. You can even get a diffuser for your car instead of using the old fashioned, tree shaped, smelly things of yesteryear.

So, get with the times. Throw out all your Febreze type air fresheners that are loaded with toxins affecting your nervous system. These wonderful, natural perfumes can be mixed together to create your own unique or signature scent. Go ahead, get creative! Let me know what you come up with.

Storm lashes Florida’s gulf coast, again

On December 19th, 2018, another storm hit the gulf coast of Florida. Unlike storms Gordon and Michael that hit in September and October respectively, this storm had no name. At least none that I could discover.

We heard the storm warnings on the radio and TV, so the ominous clouds, lashing rain and rising ocean swells were no surprise…

storm clouds
storm
storm
lashing rain

Named or not, I was a witness to this particular storm. Any of the locals I spoke to that day claimed they had never seen the waves so high. A stranger sent me this copy of a video he shot. That is my husband checking out the waves crashing on and washing over the jetty as the rest of us huddled further back from the action.

waves at the North Jetty on Casey Key, Nokomis, Florida

The news spread fast, locals and visitors alike flocked over the drawbridge that connects Casey Key to the mainland of Nokomis. The road to the north jetty was well travelled with those wanting to witness the wrath of Mother Nature. The level of the water rose so high with the wind and rain that most of the jetty was under water and the beach was barely walkable…

storm
crashing waves
storm
crashing waves wash out jetty
storm
high water levels
storm
crashing waves
storm
massive waves
storm
water level rising to grasses

Later that day, the waves subsided somewhat, the skies cleared and a spectacular sunset promised better weather the next day…

storm
here comes the sun!
storm
flooded beach
storm
beach sunset

drawing the shell collectors to the beach and the (rather bedraggled) wildlife to the jetty the next morning…

storm
shell collecting after the storm
storm
collecting shells after the storm
disoriented (rescued) crab

white ibis

sleepy pelicans

Although the beautiful beach and spectacular ocean front homes had already sustained an incredible amount of damage in the previous storms, we saw more the next morning…

storm
steps buried in sand
storm
steps buried in sand
storm
beach erosion
storm
beach erosion
storm
storm damage
storm
storm damage

Everywhere I travel, I cannot help but stop to admire (and snap pictures of) the local plants. That’s the gardener in me I guess…

storm
bird of paradise
storm
bougainvillia
storm
variegated yuccas
storm
beach access

The stormy weather lasted around 24 hours. As much as it was spectacular to witness it, I prefer walking the beach with calmer waters and sunshine.

December 21st is our winter solstice

Today, December 21st, is our winter solstice here in Canada and the rest of the northern hemisphere.  That means it’s the shortest day of the year.  It also means the days will now start to get longer.  Yaaaaaay.  Technically, winter solstice,  also referred to as mid-winter, is an astronomical event that happens as the earth travels on its orbit around the sun.

winter solstice

 

This date reminds me of my father as he, like me, much preferred summer and spring.  He always commented on the winter solstice, getting great satisfaction in the fact that the long winter was getting shorter.  On the flip side, on June 21st, our summer solstice, he would grumble and complain that the days were getting shorter.

 

Purple jacaranda trees

These jacaranda trees, currently in bloom in southern Australia, are beautiful!  These pictures show how these spectacular trees line the streets in Adelaide…

 

The pictures remind me of our crab apple trees in the spring and our maple trees in the fall here in Canada.  The striking purple color of the jacaranda trees grabbed my attention of course because GRAY IS NOT MY COLOR;  I am a blatant  PURPLEHOLIC.

 

Never have I ever

Never have I ever seen lavender or clematis blooming in late October!  At least not in our zone 4 to 5 gardens here in Ottawa.   I have cut back June lavender blossoms before resulting in late August, even early September reblooming, and have seen spring blooming clematis rebloom in August, but never late October…

 

 

Ornamental grasses are at their peak, waving in the breeze.  Other perennials still in bloom or reblooming include clematis, lots of roses,  phlox, butterfly bush, Russian sage, periwinkle and more.

 

 

I am supposed to be doing fall cleanups on my GARDENS4U clients’ gardens this week, but their gardens are still so nice I hesitate to cut anything down.  I did get covered in burs and seed heads removing some weeds though; a peril of the job…

never
seed heads and weeds

 

Even the butterflies and bees are loving this warm fall weather; this butterfly bush was covered with both…

 

I am in no hurry for frost to send these beautiful perennials into dormancy.

Cottage wildflower garden

A large space on our cottage property currently acts as a buffer between the road and the cottage.  Since the road is a major highway in these parts, a buffer is necessary.  A wildflower garden for a buffer is in the making.

A 2-foot strip of vegetation along the road is cut by the township each year.   Adjacent to that there is a flat strip, then the land begins to slope downward before it levels off.   The slope is approximately 10 feet wide.  A row of cedar hedges was planted approximately 40 feet from the road many years ago, but the area between the bottom of the slope and the cedars is left to grow wild.

Last season we planted several evergreen trees (pine and spruce) at the bottom of the slope.  This season we planted more, spaced throughout the flat area to create (eventually) a forest of evergreen trees as a visual and noise barrier between the road and the cottage.

I have always felt this whole area was wasted space,  What does a gardener do with wasted space? She turns it into a garden of course, in this case, a wildflower garden.  This season I whipper snipped the flat area around the evergreens.  I had to be careful to avoid all of the frogs as there were lots. I then sprinkled the seeds randomly along the slope and flat strip close to the road. Pink and white coneflowers, Queen Anne’s lace, black-eyed Susans, pink and red beebalm to name a few. These plants are not exactly wildflowers but hardy and tall perennials instead.  I mixed all the seeds in one large bag as I was collecting them to achieve the random look of a wildflower garden.

I can’t wait to see what it looks like next season!

 

Blue, pink and purple hydrangeas

Some of my GARDENS4U  gardens have blue hydrangeas and some have pink hydrangeas.  A garden I was at recently had both.

 

 

We all know that blue and pink together make purple, so I was not surprised to see a few pale purple blossoms…

 

hydrangeas
purple hydrangea

 

So, how do you know if your soil is acidic or alkaline?  Try this simple soil pH test using ingredients from your kitchen:

  • Collect soil from different parts of your garden.  If you have a large garden, you may want to label your containers.  Styrofoam cups work well.
  • put 2 spoonfuls of soil into each of several containers.  (Two containers for each location)
  • Add 1/2 cup of vinegar to the soil in one container.  If it fizzes, you have alkaline soil, with a pH between 7 and 8.
  • If it doesn’t fizz after doing the vinegar test, then add distilled water to the other container taken from the same location until the 2 teaspoons of soil are muddy. Add 1/2 cup baking soda. If it fizzes you have acidic soil, with a pH between 5 and 6.
  • If your soil doesn’t react at all it is neutral with a pH of close to 7.

 

pH-scale-courtesy-of-chesapeakquarterly.net_

 

 

If you prefer your hydrangeas to be pink, make your soil alkaline (pH of 6.0-6.2)  You can do this by adding garden lime to your soil.

If you would rather your hydrangeas to be a blue color lower your soil’s pH to the acidic side (between 5.2 and 5.5).  Acidic soil can be achieved by adding 1/2 cup wettable sulfur powder or other commercial soil acidifiers each spring.  Pine needles or pine bark applied as a mulch also creates acidic soil conducive to blue hydrangeas.  So does compost or composted manure.  Some gardeners have had success using coffee grounds to provide acidic soil around their hydrangeas.

Once you get your soil’s pH figured out, try adding the appropriate soil amendments to just one side of a hydrangea bush to see if you can get both pink and blue blooms on one plant; perhaps you will end up with purple!

Thunderstorm season

The weather here in Ottawa has only seen a few hot sunny days typical of our usual summer season.  Thunderstorm season would be a much more accurate description of what we have seen.

 

Once again I was chased from a client’s garden due to a thunderstorm today.  I am averaging at least one thunderstorm per week this summer.  There has been a lot more than that, but I am only counting the ones during the day when I am out and about visiting gardens.

I do not mind working in the rain, in fact, rain helps keep me cool and keeps the mosquitoes away from me.  Wet gardens are also easier to remove weeds from.  If it rains too hard, I seek shelter under an overhang until the rain subsides enough to work in…

 

Thunderstorms, however, make me nervous when I get caught outside in one.   I am always worried that if I get struck by lightning, no one would notice or find me since I usually work in gardens where no one is home.

I do love to watch and listen to thunderstorms, but from the safety of my home though!