Shelley’s battle to beat lung cancer

This video was created by a dear family friend whose wife died of lung cancer at the (much too) young age of 51…

 

This is a very sad story, but apparently very common.  Dave’s message is clear; please share it.  Get any symptoms checked out and demand answers when you feel something is not quite right with your health.

Be proactive and persistant; early detection is the best way to beat cancer of any kind!

Growing up a tomboy

I was recently inspired by a post on Facebook about beautiful daughters.  What do tomboys and beautiful daughters have in common?  Well, I have no beautiful daughters (I do have three handsome sons and a brand new beautiful daughter-in-law though) and if you asked my mother she would say it is because I was a tomboy growing up.  She actually told me this when I had my second son. Although she had passed away before my third son was born, I am almost positive she had a good laugh then too, convinced of her theory more than ever.

I grew up in a family of six children; my poor mother gave birth to all of us within 8 years, with no multiple births either!  As the youngest girl with three brothers closer in age to me than my two sisters, it is no wonder I was a tomboy. It seemed too that most of the neighbourhood children were boys.  We always had lots of fun playing road hockey, flag football, tennis, hide and seek and more.

The fact that I was a tomboy was annoying to my mother who tried hard to get me interested in dolls, pretty dresses, jewelry, etc.  I remember being very ticked off one Christmas because my brothers got walkie-talkies and I received a ring.  I probably pouted about it for days.  I also ticked my mother off when I gave away all of my Barbie paraphernalia to the little girl down the street.  I thought it was very generous of me.

I like to think growing up a tomboy prepared me for my most important role, mother of three (very active) boys….

 

 

 

Proud momma bear

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Nothing makes a momma bear prouder than compliments about her children.  This past weekend as my eldest son got married, I was honored and humbled by the number of people that commented on how handsome, polite, respectful,  charming and well-rounded all three of my sons are.

I have always believed that a mother’s most important job is raising her children, so it was very rewarding to hear that others recognize that I (we, as I must give credit to my husband too) have done a decent job.

This momma bear could not be prouder!

 

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pictures from Pixabay

 

 

 

The ultimate price

The headlines read: “two dead, one injured in Ottawa’s Byward Market shootings”

The 43-year-old man that was shot and killed paid the ultimate price believing he was helping his friend.  When his friend was shot and wounded after an argument with the gunman, the victim and several other witnesses chased the shooter.  Why would he do this?  No one will ever know what he hoped to accomplish.   As the details of the tragedy continue to unravel,  the media is quick to point out the victim’s failings.  Nothing, however, has been said about the suspect.

Although the victim had a shady (drug related) past, I only knew him as the beloved brother of my grandson’s mom.  Why is that?  Because he and his family were trying hard to put that shady past behind them.  He had turned his life around so we (my family) knew him as a loving son, husband, father, brother, uncle, and brother-in-law that would do just about anything for anyone in need.

What the media fails to mention is that no one, nowhere, deserves to be gunned down in cold blood, unless of course they have just shot and killed someone themselves.  The fact that some people resort to the use of a gun to settle their arguments sickens, and in this case deeply saddens me.

For the sake of the victim’s shocked, grieving family, I hope the investigation wraps up soon and reveals that the victim’s alcohol induced actions were confrontational and foolish, but valiant and well intended.

Bonding over the flu bug

What do bonding and the flu bug have in common?  Not much, except when you and your family members spend 24 hours looking after each other.

My son started feeling the flu bug symptoms first in this household.  Around 9pm he complained that his stomach felt bad after an evening snack.  He started vomiting violently shortly after.  I had gone for our usual one hour walk with my husband, but could not muster the energy to complete the usual trek half way through.  I guess my body’s energy level was being used up trying to fight off the flu bug.

I had gone for our usual one hour walk with my husband, but halfway through could not muster the energy to complete the usual trek.  I guess my body’s energy level was being used up trying to fight off the flu bug.

Although I did not understand why I was so tired at the time, it quickly became apparent on our return home.  If my other son, his girlfriend and her 3-year-old daughter had not been sick with the flu the previous week, I would have attributed our illness to the salmon the members of our household ate for dinner a few hours earlier.

I went to bed exhausted around 1130 pm, and soon after the vomiting started.  My husband started vomiting around 2am.  Luckily we have enough bathrooms to accommodate three sick people at the same time; it was not a pretty site.

A kind neighbour brought (left it on the doorstep and rang the bell) over Pedialite freezies, Gatorade and gingerale to keep us hydrated throughout the 24 hour ordeal.

I posted a similar story a few years ago.  When I worked in the health care industry, the flu shot was mandatory each year.  The occupational health nurse went around the hospital I worked in, inoculating members of each department.  It was quick and convenient.  Since retiring, I see the advertisements for free flu shots at local drug stores here in Ottawa each fall, but never seem to find the time to stop in to get one.

After this ordeal, I will make sure I get my flu shot next year!

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Find a purple bin to donate used clothing to BBBSO

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Did you know donations of used clothing has become a competition?  Many organizations (charitable and otherwise) have contracts with distributors to make money from your donations of clothing and small household items.  This is not a problem when the proceeds fall into the right hands, to be used for the right reasons. Unfortunately, there are those that prey on the opportunities intended to promote generosity and compassion for the less fortunate.  Donation bins are popping up everywhere, and not always in approved locations.  If not approved and supported by the City of Ottawa, they will be removed.

If you wish to keep reusable items out of our overflowing landfills and support a non-profit organization that provides mentors to at-risk youngsters in our community, check out this option.  The Ottawa branch of the Big Brothers Big Sisters Association (BBBSO) is spreading the word and dropping off their distinctive purple bins to collect donations of old clothing. These PURPLE BINS are approved by the City of Ottawa, maintained and monitored by the BBBSO, with all proceeds going to the BBBSO.

There are many ways you can support the Big Brothers and Big Sisters program.  Individuals can donate money or donate time by mentoring a youngster.  The emergence of the purple bins in Ottawa has now made it even easier for individuals and organizations to provide support in our community.   Organizations can organize a clothing drive or apply to have a purple bin (maintained and monitored by BBBSO) at their location.

The Big Brothers and Big Sisters program has always been somewhat of a tradition in the Sliter (my maiden name) family.  My cousin was the first executive director and co-founder at the Cornwall branch for many years.  My brother, nephew and I have all mentored several youngsters.   My nephew is the past president and on the board of directors here in Ottawa.  He also drops off purple bins to approved locations:

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Check out the purple bin link above for details on how you can get involved in this wonderful cause.  You may start a family tradition!

You gotta have faith

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Funerals always make me think.  I just returned from one where the service was about the subject of faith.  Not just faith as the belief in and practice of religion, but faith as an individual practice.

als always make me think.  I just returned from one where the service was about the subject of faith.  Not just faith as the belief in and practice of religion, but faith as an individual practice. Continue reading